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Using the Edmonton Obesity Staging System to predict mode of delivery after labor induction

  • Author / Creator
    Demsky, Ashley N
  • Objective: To evaluate the use of the Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Obstetrics (EOSSo) in predicting cesarean delivery amongst term, nulliparous, singleton pregnancies in women with overweight or obesity, who are undergoing an induction of labor. Methods: A prospective-cohort study was performed in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Women undergoing an induction of labor at term were recruited to either a sample cohort, including women with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥25.0 kg/m2 at first antenatal visit, or a control cohort with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Participating women provided a self-reported health history and consented to review of their medical records allowing allocation into EOSSo categories. The primary outcome was the rate of cesarean delivery based on EOSSo category. Secondary outcomes consisted of a summary score of adverse maternal, delivery, and neonatal events. Results: Overall, 345 women were recruited, with a participation rate of 93.7%. The sample cohort consisted of 276 women with overweight or obesity, while the control cohort included 69 normal weight women. Overall rate of cesarean delivery was 30.4% for the control cohort and 35.8%, 29.9%, 43.2%, and 90.5% for women assigned an EOSSo category 0, 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P < 0.001). A summary score was not indicative of overall rate of adverse maternal, delivery, and neonatal events (P = 0.22). Conclusion: The EOSSo may help predict the chance of cesarean delivery in a high-risk group of nulliparous women with overweight or obesity, who are undergoing an induction of labor at term.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Fall 2019
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Science
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-njfz-w275
  • License
    Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.