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Teacher Faith Education for A Secular Age: Issues in and Insight for Alberta’s Catholic Schools

  • Author / Creator
    Sarnecki, Dean C
  • In this philosophical study the author investigated the reality of religious pluralism and secularism and their effects on Catholic education in Alberta to provide insight into improvements for teacher faith formation. He used Charles Taylor’s (2007) work, A Secular Age, as a lens through which to examine both belief and unbelief in today’s world and his language surrounding secularism and belief. As the academic literature has shown, several educational issues consistently compel controversy among Canadians and publicly funded Catholic education. A detailed examination of the most significant conflicting issues is necessary for faith formation in a diverse, secular space of education in the province. The author examined four issues examined: (a) defining religious education in the secular age, (b) analyzing varying viewpoints of the purpose of human being and Catholic education, (c) ecology and care for creation and Catholic schools as possible points of congruence, and (d) the courts as the battleground of a culture war between secular society and Catholic schools. Building upon these chapters and the literature about faith formation, he presents the implications and recommendations for Catholic education in Alberta and offers insight into the future of Catholic teachers’ formation, professional development, and opportunities for teachers’ formation as Catholic witnesses.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Spring 2021
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Doctor of Philosophy
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-njj9-a879
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.