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Care Aides Working More Than One Job in Long Term Care

  • Author / Creator
    Doan, Hong Helen
  • Background: Older adults living in long term care (LTC) homes are a vulnerable care group. Most of the care they receive is provided by care aides who are also a vulnerable working group – with high risks for job burnout, job dissatisfaction, injury, and poor work engagement. In addition, many care aides work more than one job in LTC (or at least did pre-pandemic), yet little is known about the possible effects on care aides of working more than one job. As COVID-19 continues to spread across the world, the LTC sector faces concerns about subsequent waves of COVID-19, virus variants emerging for which vaccines may be less effective, and a future where COVID-19 may be endemic, presenting a “moving target” and requiring ongoing, adaptable strategies to protect older adults in LTC homes. Policy and decision makers are faced with assessing existing trends and deciding on future policies related to “one worksite” policies and other public health measures, often with limited evidence. Purpose: The purpose of my thesis research study was to determine if care aides who work more than one job in LTC homes report positive or negative work life outcomes compared to those who work one job. Objectives: My research objectives were: 1. To describe existing evidence on the impact on care aides of working more than one job. 2. To describe the proportion of care aides working more than one job, their common demographic characteristics, and to determine if working more than one job in long term care affects care aides (i.e., positively, negatively, both, or neither) in comparison to care aides who work one job.iii Methods: The thesis consisted of two studies: (1) an integrative literature review on the benefits or adverse events of nurses or care aides when working more than one job; and (2) a secondary analysis of existing survey data available from the longitudinal research program, Translating Research in Elderly Care (TREC) collected from May 1, 2017 to December 19, 2017, on care aides surveys. Findings: My findings demonstrated that there is no research on care aides working more than one job in LTC and no Canadian studies or reports. Neither the United States nor Canada systematically collect information on care aides working more than one job or the possible effects of when one works multiple jobs. The integrative literature review found that working multiple jobs can have both negative and positive effects on nurses. The negative effects include absenteeism, burnout, mental, and physical fatigue but there is evidence of positive effects such as economic stability, educational skills and training, and workplace autonomy. While the effects for care aides working more than one job is inconclusive, more rigorous research into the motivations for care aides working more than one job is indicated as the COVID-19 pandemic has restricted care aides from working in more than one job. In addition, the secondary analysis revealed that 26.5% of care aides worked in more than one LTC home and that working more than one job was negatively associated with work engagement. Conclusion: This research project adds to the knowledge about care aides working more than one job in LTC homes in two major ways. First, it identifies a clear gap in the literature regarding care aides working more than one job. It also contributes to knowledge regarding the benefits and the effects of working more than one job. Second, my thesis identifies the prevalence, characteristics, and outcomes when care aides work more than one job in LTC. My findings suggest that working more than one job may affect care aides' work engagement, iv specifically vigor (the high energy levels and resilience care aides have in difficult circumstances). This thesis is a beginning foundation on which to build our understanding on care aides working more than one job in LTC. It provides the necessary foundation for future research studies addressing working multiple jobs. This is a paper-based thesis comprised of four chapters: (1) an introduction, (2) an integrative literature review, (3) a manuscript on care aide demographics and the effects of working more than one job; and (4) a discussion and concluding chapter.

  • Subjects / Keywords
  • Graduation date
    Spring 2021
  • Type of Item
    Thesis
  • Degree
    Master of Nursing
  • DOI
    https://doi.org/10.7939/r3-nwmw-yt96
  • License
    This thesis is made available by the University of Alberta Libraries with permission of the copyright owner solely for non-commercial purposes. This thesis, or any portion thereof, may not otherwise be copied or reproduced without the written consent of the copyright owner, except to the extent permitted by Canadian copyright law.